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4/06/2006

It's like a jungle sometimes...


...it makes me wonder how I keep from going under.
It's time for old school hip hop video Thursday.

Let's get in the time machine.
Set the dial to 1983.
I'm sitting in my mom's car listening to a best of Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five tape I just bought at Jamesway.
Playing The Message and Survival over and over and over...
Like Biggie said-
I let my tape rock '’til my tape popped.

For a 13 year old white kid from rural PA, this was like a bomb going off in my brain.
Wannabe? Sure, I'll own up to that title.
And I so wanted to be.
Anything.
Anything but what I was.
What kid doesn't want to be someone else for a bit?
A trip on the wheels of steel helped me see the world in a different way.
Thanks Flash.
j

2 comments:

TT Boy said...

Holy Bejesus. Midnight Madness at Jamesway. As much a blast from the past as Flash himself. And I remember daydreamthief when he went by the moniker Raheem. Work that floor, J.

I also have memories of a white rural kid digging this new music. First one: my older half-brother, who would visit from time to time and occassionally live with us (in and out of trouble) during my grade school days, had a 12 inch of Sugar Hill's Rapper's Delight. That started it for me. Damn, I was young then. I can remember being very puzzled by the words (why would you invite a friend if your girl starts acting up?), but the famous word play and disco beat really did it for me. I remember holding up my old school cassette recorder up to the speaker and taping it. It sounded so much different then what I was hearing at school (I can remember rocking Queen's The Game as well as I Was Made for Lovin' you by Kiss when I controlled the record player at indoor recess). The problem with being a rural kid in the late 70s/ early 80s is you couldn't download the outside world, so we were very isolated and missed alot of this way back when.

To further elaborate, I could barely windmill my fat ass and I was still the top breaker on the block. Block is a relative term where we came from. It meant if I battled the middle aged men at the Slovak Club, I could make a little scratch to buy some little charleston chews.

Thanks for jarring my memory, J.

crawdaddy said...

Punxsy was/is such a weird bubble.
Bad and good.
Let's focus on the good for now.
I'm right with you.
It was this mullet high culture mixed with these crazy chunks of underground culture that worked their way into the stew.
You'd be biting into a big steaming slice of what you thought was a Foreigner 4/Billy Squire rock block, and you would get this brief taste of punk, hip hop, new wave...
You would be riding around town in someone's souped up Chevy Nova listening to a mixtape made by a friend of a friend of a girlfriend's cousin of crazy music that was already 10 years passé in whatever big city where it started
What the hell is that?
Ron Cielo (?),Jerry Kee, the Lewises, Ritzi, etc. are greeted like voyagers from the future.
Taping songs from the radio from WAMO and WXXP. I remember Aaron taping that mix of King's I have a dream speech, and blasting it the 8th grade hallway on our boombox before class while we practiced our breakdancing. How many taboos were we violating then?
8th grade...
What a weird weird time.
j